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Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Oolites for Obama in Food Orgy ...

A friend with whom I was lunching on Sunday suggested that if I wished to attract readers to the blog I should see what happened if I associated Obama, food and sex in the title of the post.  So I'm sorry to disappoint anyone who's reading this because they thought it might be salacious.  If you are reading this and wondering what an oolite is: the answer is here.

To return to the food theme and the edibile appearance limestone can sometimes assume, here's Dr Ferris:
"It would appear that Crickley Hill Man's appetite for meringue and chipples is of a similar order to his legendary love of banana custard. However, this will be my last posting on the subject, as I have now found the origin of the term 'meringue' in Phil's 'Crickley Hill: The Hillfort Defences.' I'm not sure how I missed it previously. On page 47 Phil describes 'a large area of very hard white concreted limestone. Its consistency and appearance was exactly caught by the nickname immediately applied to it in compliment to our then chef, Tony Watts, renowned for his robust cooking: for the past two-and-a-half decades this immensely hard material has always been called 'MERINGUE'.'
 
Should Crickley Hill Man ever find himself tempted to raid his capacious fridge some time for a midnight snack, he might better turn to page 52 of 'Crickley Hill' and peruse Figure III.40 where he will see a thick deposit of 'meringue with grey burnt stones' temptingly topped off with a generous cholesterol-free spread of 'dark humus with chipples.' Altogether fewer calories and more intellectual stimulation there."

Shouldn't that read houmous with chips?

2 comments:

Tony Watts said...
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Tony Watts said...

Its good to see that my meringue has been recorded in the annals of British archaeology - not so the sandwiches, however I was happy to see my food referrred to as 'robust' - I think.
One year in celebration of someting or other I made Rampart Cake which was very carefully detailed and bore some resemblance to the trench that had been cut through the rampart at the time.I dont suppose anyone has a photo?